“Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy” or the “BRIDGE Act” Introduces Provisional Protected Presence

Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy

We have seen a lot of legislations and executive orders being introduced in the past few weeks that are not so immigrant-friendly. Non-U.S. citizen are particularly worried about their future in this country. Among the concerned and confused are the 750,000 participants of the Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

On January 12, 2017, the Senate and the House of Representatives separately introduced a bill called “Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy” or the “BRIDGE Act” [S. 128] (17021434) and [H.R. 496] (17021433). The BRIDGE Act authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to grant provisional protected presence for three (3) years. Provisional protected presence is granted if the alien—

(1) was born after June 15, 1981;

(2) entered the United States before attaining 16 years of age;

(3) continuously resided in the United States between June 15, 2007, and the date on which the alien files an application under this section;

(4) was physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and on the date on which the alien files an application under this section;

(5) was unlawfully present in the United States on June 15, 2012;

(6) on the date on which the alien files an application for provisional protected presence—

  • (A) is enrolled in school or in an education program assisting students in obtaining a regular high school diploma or its recognized equivalent under State law, or in passing a general educational development exam or other State-authorized exam;
  • (B) has graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school;
  • (C) has obtained a general educational development certificate; or
  • (D) is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;

(7) has not been convicted of—

  • (A) a felony;
  • (B) a significant misdemeanor; or
  • (C) three or more misdemeanors not occurring on the same date and not arising out of the same act, omission, or scheme of misconduct; and

(8) does not otherwise pose a threat to national security or a threat to public safety.

Provisional protected presence looks extremely similar to DACA (except for a few word changes). A person qualifies for DACA is he or she:

(1) Was under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;

(2) Came to the United States before reaching 16th birthday;

(3) Has continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;

(4) Was physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;

(5) Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;

(6) Is currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and;

(7) Has not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

If granted Provisional protected presence, the alien is not considered to be unlawfully present in the United States.

Proposed Law Allows Certain Undocumented Immigrants to Enlist in the Military

While Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest (MAVNI) is in the limbo and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) DREAMers are facing an uncertain future, this week, U.S. Representative Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) re-introduced the Encourage New Legalized Immigrants to Start Training Act (ENLIST Act). The ENLIST Act applies only to undocumented immigrants who were under the age of 15 when they were brought to the U.S. by their parents prior to 2012. They have to speak English, have a high school degree, as well as passing other strict military requirements. However, it does not guarantee applicants would be accepted into the military.

Denham’s bill was introduced in 2014, and again in 2015, but never passed. The ENLIST Act is not to incentivize more illegal immigrants to come to the United States because it only applies to people who are already in the U.S.

本周,美国代表Jeff Denham(R-Turlock)重新介绍了“鼓励新的合法移民开始培训法”(ENLIST法案)。 ENLIST法案仅适用于2012年之前由父母带到美国的15岁以下的无证移民。他们必须说英语,具有高中学历以及通过其他严格的军事要求。 然而,它不保证申请人将被接纳进军队。

Denham的法案于2014年推出,2015年再次推出,但从未通过。 Denham说,ENLIST法案不会激励更多的非法移民来到美国,因为它只适用于已经在美国的人。