How To: Temporary Residents in the United States applying for a Kansas Driver’s License

In July 2011, Kansas Department of Revenue (KDOR) began utilizing the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service’s “Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlement System” (SAVE), to determine the status of temporary residents in the United States when such applicants apply for a Driver’s License.

If you are a temporary resident to the United States, follow these instructions for obtaining a SAVE Verification when applying for a Kansas Driver’s License:

  1. Visit a Full Service Driver’s License Exam Station. A list of all locations can be found at http://www.ksrevenue.org/dmv-dlstations.html
  2. At the Exam Station, you must present all original government issued documents that pertain to your immigration status, including the following:Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 2.42.58 PM
  3. The Driver’s License Examiner will use your documents to verify your immigration status with SAVE. If your immigration status is verified, the process to obtain a Kansas Driver’s License will continue.
  4. If your immigration status is NOT verified, you will be required to fill out a SAVE Verification – Request Form (download here: save verification request form) and provide copies of all documents used for the initial verification to the Driver’s License Examiner via USPS mail to Division of Vehicles, SAVE Coordinator, PO Box 2188, Topeka, KS 66601-2188 or via e-mail: LAWFUL.PRESENCE@KDOR.KS.GOV
  5. The Driver’s License Examiner will send all of your documents to the home office where additional verification will be administered by the SAVE Coordinator.
  6. After additional verification is received, you will be notified via mail, email or phone as to your immigration status.

 

“Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy” or the “BRIDGE Act” Introduces Provisional Protected Presence

Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy

We have seen a lot of legislations and executive orders being introduced in the past few weeks that are not so immigrant-friendly. Non-U.S. citizen are particularly worried about their future in this country. Among the concerned and confused are the 750,000 participants of the Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

On January 12, 2017, the Senate and the House of Representatives separately introduced a bill called “Bar Removal of Immigrants Who Dream and Grow the Economy” or the “BRIDGE Act” [S. 128] (17021434) and [H.R. 496] (17021433). The BRIDGE Act authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security to grant provisional protected presence for three (3) years. Provisional protected presence is granted if the alien—

(1) was born after June 15, 1981;

(2) entered the United States before attaining 16 years of age;

(3) continuously resided in the United States between June 15, 2007, and the date on which the alien files an application under this section;

(4) was physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and on the date on which the alien files an application under this section;

(5) was unlawfully present in the United States on June 15, 2012;

(6) on the date on which the alien files an application for provisional protected presence—

  • (A) is enrolled in school or in an education program assisting students in obtaining a regular high school diploma or its recognized equivalent under State law, or in passing a general educational development exam or other State-authorized exam;
  • (B) has graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school;
  • (C) has obtained a general educational development certificate; or
  • (D) is an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;

(7) has not been convicted of—

  • (A) a felony;
  • (B) a significant misdemeanor; or
  • (C) three or more misdemeanors not occurring on the same date and not arising out of the same act, omission, or scheme of misconduct; and

(8) does not otherwise pose a threat to national security or a threat to public safety.

Provisional protected presence looks extremely similar to DACA (except for a few word changes). A person qualifies for DACA is he or she:

(1) Was under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;

(2) Came to the United States before reaching 16th birthday;

(3) Has continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;

(4) Was physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;

(5) Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;

(6) Is currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and;

(7) Has not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

If granted Provisional protected presence, the alien is not considered to be unlawfully present in the United States.